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Virtual Lifeline “wireless lanyard” Engine Shut Off System (Patented)
Thanks to Virtual Lifeline “wireless lanyard” System, for the first time ever every staff member and passenger onboard can have falls overboard protection without the hassles caused by old school tethers or proximity based devices. Each person wears a small, durable, reusable sensor allowing freedom to move about the boat. Only upon submersion the sensor immediately activates - sending a signal to the onboard control module, which
Virtual Lifeline Helm Mount (available in any configuration, Customization available):

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ITEM #: Description: MSRP:
  Control Module Enclosures are Polycarbonate, Rated IP65  
3245X Universal System - Single or Dual Outboard Motors, Single Inboard/Sterndrive Motor, 
Single Diesel (w/specs)
Comes complete with 2 Sensors & External Antenna
$599.00
3212X Dual Motor - Inboard/Sterndrive or Diesel (w/specs)
Comes complete with 2 Sensors & External Antenna
$649.00
3293X Triple Motor Configurations - Call for estimates Estimated
3294X Quad Motor - Outboard - Call for estimates Estimated
21112 Additional Activation Output $69.00
     
Additional/Refurbishing Sensors: Rated at IP68
1170X CAST Sensor (1 each) please provide color code $79.00
1270X CAST Sensors (2 each/pkg) please provide color code $145.00
3170X VL Sensor (1 each) please provide color code $79.00
3270X VL Sensors (2 each/pkg)  please provide color code $145.00
31709 Sensor Refurbishing (Battery Replaced, Re-Sealed & Tested) $49.00
Voltage +12 VDC nominal (+10.2 min to +15max)
Current 125mA average
Alarm 85dB
Frequency 318 MHz
Dimensions 7.5” L X 5.25” W X 2.75” D
Housing Material Polycarbonate with an O-Ring seal
Signal Strength Line of Sight 200 feet
Installation Approximately an hour
Warranty One (1) year
Specifications

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sounds an audible and visual alarm and shuts off the motor(s). Someone remaining onboard may quickly activate Rescue Mode, restart the motor and safely retrieve the person in the water. It’s that simple!

Virtual Lifeline (VL) is easy to install and is the only “wireless lanyard” system that meets or exceeds ABYC standards for Emergency Shut Off Devices (ABYC A-33) and is FLW approved for tournament fishing. Being ABYC compliant, you can be assured VL will not compromise the safe and normal operation of your vessel or any of its onboard systems. Virtual Lifeline will only enhance the level of safety for every employee and their passenger onboard!
Introduced in 2005, VL has received multiple industry awards for its function and effectiveness. This “wireless lanyard” system has become industry’s choice to help combat the hazards associated with falls overboard and will help reduce your exposure to work related risk.
Virtual Lifeline is available for all engine configurations and can be customized to meet most any special request. Easy to install and maintain, VL should be the first safety enhancement made to your fleet for employee safety.

From entry level to OEM, Virtual Lifeline Systems are affordably priced. VL can be ordered factory direct, at your local dealership, or at the boat manufacturer of your choice.


FAQs
Q. How many sensors can be used with Virtual Lifeline?
A. There is no limit to the number of sensors you may use with Virtual Lifeline.

Q. Can the sensor be reused?
A. Yes, sensors may be reused as many times as battery life allows (approximately 4-5 years).

Q. How does the sensor work?
A. Inside is a wafer thin circuit board that “senses” when it’s submerged. This accumulation of water activates the circuitry and immediately sends a signal to the control module which responds accordingly.

Q. Does Virtual Lifeline work in salt and fresh water?
A. Yes.

Q. Does Virtual Lifeline compromise the existing kill switch in any way?
A. No, Being ABYC A-33 compliant, VL does not “piggy back” onto the existing kill switch, nor do you take the kill switch out of service. VL simply integrates into the ignition system (in series or parallel) as is the current kill switch.

Q. Why is this important?

A. If you take a device and “piggy back” onto another, you’ve increased the potential to compromise both devices. If one is damaged or fails, both devices will become incapacitated. By properly integrating into the ignition system, you maintain system independence. Both the current kill switch and VL can function as designed, shutting off the motor when activated. This also provides the operator with a redundant (or back up) safety system and maintains the standards by which the boat was built to.

Q. Why did Propeller Guard Technologies choose “submersion” over “proximity” based technology?
A. Actually, years prior to introducing Virtual Lifeline, we tried proximity based technology as a means to shut off a boat’s motor(s). The outcome of our engineering and accident reconstruction reports found “proximity” inconsistent with the normal and safe operation of a boat. To help clarify this, you should know how “proximity” works.

Proximity is based on a continuous signal being sent by a transmitter to a receiver. Loss of that signal will cause the receiver to respond according to its design. This is always associated with distance. We found this acceptable for alarming purposes only, not as a means to shut off a boat’s motor(s). On a boat, loss of a signal could be achieved in many other ways non-conducive to a motor being shut off, such as low batteries or simply compromising line of sight by (i.e. doors, walls, towels, people etc). These scenarios caused numerous false activations.

One other concern was the outcome to our “circle of death” evaluations. Simulating a person in the water, we put a boat into the “circle of death” pattern. Due to the boat remaining close to the victim, signal strength was maintained. Thus, the motor did not shut down placing the victim in a hazardous position.

Q. What about false activations with Virtual Lifeline?
A. As with most "proximity" based alarms and/or shut off devices, false activations are very common. All you have to do is block the (always on) signal by a towel, walking around a corner, or even by passengers walking in front of one another.

Also, how many times have you accidently pulled the tether by reaching for something? Virtual Lifeline has been designed to eliminate false activations. VL will only activate if you simulate a submersion. Only then will VL shut off the motor and sound an alarm.

Simulating a submersion may cause an inadvertent activation, but definitely not a false one. However, being ABYC A-33 compliant, you can restart the motor(s) very quickly. Simply go to neutral, press the Rescue Mode switch and start the motor. It's that quick.

Q. What is Rescue Mode?
A. Rescue Mode deactivates the motor shut down circuitry of VL enabling the quick restarting of the engine to recover the person overboard.

Q. What types of motors work with Virtual Lifeline?
A. Virtual Lifeline may be used with any type of propulsion system, whether you have one or several motors.

Q. Are there any other options available for Virtual Lifeline?
A. Yes, VL can be customized for many uses. Below are just a few options our customers have requested:
·Activation of exterior audible and/or visual alarms.
·Activation of man overboard circuitry on some chart plotters.
·Activation of man/officer in distress radio frequencies.
·Alarm only for boats, dock side employment and family swimming pools.
·Modified for fleet requirements.

These are just a few of the reasons Propeller Guard Technologies chose not to develop a “wireless lanyard” using “proximity” based technology during emergency conditions.

According to US Coast Guard’s Boating Accident Reporting Database (BARD), 53% of all boating injuries and death are related to falls overboard (FOB). The most recent statistics disprove the notion that a falls overboard event is isolated only to the boat operator. It is now estimated 34% of all FOB events are the passengers going overboard, while the operator is at the helm. Unfortunately, these reports do not separate work related accidents from recreational accidents.